Archive for the 'Uncategorized' Category

26
Apr
16

eu referendum for what it’s worth

For a clear expression of the issues regarding the coming British referendum I cannot do better than refer you to the following post by Free Church Moderator David Robertson.  I agree fully with his conclusions.

https://theweeflea.com/2016/04/26/european-referendum-the-tipping-point/

I should add for my European friends that although I wish Britain to be out of the EU that in no way suggests hostility to my European neighbours.  I have had many happy holidays in many areas of Europe.  Europe and the EU are two different entities.  

22
Feb
16

the watchmaker argument for a creator

Is the watchmaker argument for the existence of God childish?  Should Christians abandon it?  Or is it biblical?

For every house is built by someone, but God is the builder of everything. 

Hebs 3:4

and

The wrath of God is being revealed from heaven against all the godlessness and wickedness of people, who suppress the truth by their wickedness, since what may be known about God is plain to them, because God has made it plain to them. For since the creation of the world God’s invisible qualities—his eternal power and divine nature—have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made, so that people are without excuse.  
Romans 3:18-20

05
Feb
16

giving

The treasurer stood up and spoke on behalf of the church elders, ‘I have good news and bad news.  The good news is we have enough money to build the extension. The bad news is, it is in your pockets’.

11
Dec
15

elijah and john the baptist 

It’s interesting to note the parallels Scripture draws between Elijah and John the Baptist.  Malachi had prophesied that the Coming of God to his people would be preceded by Elijah.  He would come to prepare the people for the advent of God, the arrival of the Day of the Lord (Mal 4:5,6;  cf. 3:1).

Elijah was a noted prophet who preached boldly to Israel in days of serious spiritual apostasy in Israel. He rebuked kings (1 Kings 21:17-29) and called for a national turning of hearts to the Lord (1 Kings 18:21).  His confrontation with Jezebel, King Ahab’s idolatrous and murderous wife, almost led to his death (1 Kings 19:10).

We can see clearly why John the Baptist is an Elijah figure (Mk 9:12,13).  He calls the sinful nation to repentance (1:4,5; Lk 3:7-11) and warns that judgement is pending (Lk 3:9).  The Lord is about to come and sift the people, for some it will mean salvation and for others judgement (Lk 3:15-18).  He boldly confronts Israel’s King and rebukes him leading to his imprisonment (Mk 6:17-20; Lk 3:19,20) and finally death orchestrated by Herodias, Herod’s vindictive and murderous illicit wife (Mk 6:21-29).

The parallels between Elijah and John are clear: both are bold prophets in days of spiritual apostasy; both are connected to Israel’s end-time hopes; both call the nation back to God; and both face hostile kings and their ruthless wives.  Indeed, it seems that Elijah’s experiences with Ahab’s and Elijah act as a prophecy of what would happen to John, though where Elijah lived John died (Mk 9:13).

The disciples, knowing that the scribes (rightly) insist that Elijah’s coming must precede the coming of the Day of the Lord, a day of both salvation and judgement, are puzzled that Elijah had not come.  Jesus points out that John is effectively if not actually Elijah; he has come in Elijah’s Spirit and power (Matt 11:14; Lk 1:17. cf. Jn 1:21).

Of course, the Day of the Lord, the Day of God’s Coming or Advent, seems to refer to one event in the OT.  It is only in the NT that we discover it has two phases.  He has Come and is yet to Come.  Is Elijah yet to come before the Second Coming?  There are many questions surrounding these things that I certainly know little about.  Even those who know much more have a limited grasp.  And of course only some things are revealed.

But what is revealed is for our feeding in faith.  God brings his people into his plans and purposes that we may have fellowship with him and be enriched in faith.  Hopefully this little biblical cameo further confirms our wonder at God’s ways.  God knows, we need modern day Elijahs.  We need John the Baptists.  People fearless and bold in the power of the Spirit, called by him to call for repentance and faith in the light of the Lord’s Coming.  Perhaps one such figure will prove to be the final powerful Elijah-voice and usher in the Day of the Lord.

06
May
15

songs of the son… christ in the psalms

Unlike some church traditions , the one with which I am most familiar did not use the Psalmody, nor were there liturgical readings and as a consequence the Psalms were less familiar, certainly less memorised.  What was stressed, however, was that they revealed Christ.  This Christological hermeneutic (that they spoke of Christ) was clearly correct. Christ himself laid its foundation when he said the OT Scriptures  spoke of him and upon resurrection taught his disciples to find in these Scriptures, including the Psalms,  ‘the things concerning himself’ (Lk 24:44).  Later the apostles regularly cite the OT, and not least the Psalms, as a witness to the humiliation and exaltation of Christ.  The theology of Hebrews in particular rests largely on a cluster of psalms.

It is important to recognise that a Christological reading of the OT is not a fanciful or merely imaginative reading of the OT by the apostles in the light of Christ.  They do not subscribe to the post-modern interpretative notion that what matters is not the writer’s intention but the reader’s interpretation.  These may, we are told, bear little resemblance.  The NT writers are not the vanguard of such a hermeneutic; they did not see what was not there.  They read the OT Christologically  because it was Christotelic, that is, it looked forward intentionally to the future and the arrival of the Messianic Age and Messiah, the Christ.  It was always promise awaiting fulfilment, expectation anticipating realisation.  It had a goal and that goal was Christ.  Christ and the apostles simply read the OT according to its own Christotelic intention.

This is as true of the Psalms as of any other of the OT; they too look forward. It is clear as we read them that however much they describe people and events of their  time such is the poetic excess and exuberance that the immediate context cannot satisfy the poetic vision and something more ultimate is envisaged. What seems like mere lyrical excess is much more; it is the Holy Spirit engaging the poet’s heart and mind to envisage people and events yet future.  In a word, the Psalms are prophetic.

Let me illustrate. One category of psalm, is the royal psalm.  Many psalms are written by David, Israel’s archetypal king.  Future Judaic kings were evaluated by their similarity or otherwise to David. Thus, Davidic psalms are royal psalms (though only some are so designated by scholars), expressing the perspective and aspirations of Israel’s king.  Other psalms are written as eulogies to the Davidic king.  Whether written by or for the Davidic king there is in these psalms hyperbolic elements of description and anticipation that go way beyond anything David or his successors experienced.   There is an idealising, an exaltation, that makes the psalm transcend its initial reference.  From these psalms a Davidic King and Kingdom such as Israel had never known emerges, a Warrior King who will conquer all his enemies and nurture his people.  He will have a worldwide and everlasting Kingdom over which he will reign with wisdom and justice as a priest-king by the power of a life that like his kingdom never ends.  He give his people God’s promised eternal rest (Ps 2, 18, 20, 21, 45, 72, 89, 101, 110, 132, 144. Cf. Hebs 1-5).  

He is all that is great about David and immeasurably more; the king of which they speak does not so much aspire to be like David rather David acclaims him as Lord (Ps 110). His cause (Ps 2) will be championed by God for like the nation he is God’s son (the king is a kind of embodiment of the people). Indeed, and here some psalms are most daring, he will himself be God (Ps 45, 110; Cf. Lk 20:40-44; Hebs 1).  He is both David’s son and David’s God, his offspring and his origin, the ultimate David (Ezekiel 34:23).  In Messiah, divine sonship is taken to another level.  He will not be merely a titular son, or adopted son (as were the Davidic Kings) but an actual son, the ‘one and only’ (Jn 1:14).   Such a coomposite exalted poetic vision clearly exceeds normal royal reigns; it is plainly messianic.  It is hardly surprising that Peter affirms in Acts 2 that David was a prophet (Acts 2:30,31).  Indeed David’s life as first rejected then recognised king, his suffering and consequent glory, his heart for God and literary gifts shaped him by divine providence to be the prophet who would reveal in his songs not only the shape of the messianic kingship but the inner life of Messiah, his thoughts and emotions, his agonies and ecstasies, and his odyssey of tested faith which was the messianic mission.

Which brings us to a second Christological theme that pervades the Psalms, that of the righteous or innocent sufferer.  The Davidic king is a divine son who suffers, and suffers unjustly. Psalm 22 comes immediately to mind.  It is a psalm of David, a lament (there are more than fifty psalms of lament).  For the faithful in Israel, Yahweh, the covenant keeping God, promised life, which had at its core the enjoyed presence of God.  Yet here is a faithful son – one whose faith is foundational to his life for he has trusted from his mother’s womb –  who faces death not life.  The God he expects to be near is far off; it is his enemies who are near, and ironically, it is his fidelity that they use, with animal-like ferocity and cruelty, to mock and oppress him. He endures extreme physical and psychological distress.  Pain, shame, isolation, and desolation overwhelm.  Death is so certain and imminent that he describes himself as lying in ‘the dust of death’ while his enemies divvy up his clothing; he will not be wearing them again. Yet the lament ends with a cry for deliverance (22:19-21).  The faithful son is distressed, dismayed, disoriented, and desolate but he does not doubt; he will trust with his last breath.  His cry of dereliction does not issue from a loss of faith but a loss of fellowship, of contact.

We are not told in the psalm whether the afflicted one dies or not.  In so far as it describes an actual experience of David clearly he did not die (or there would be no Psalm 22).  But like so many psalms the experience described  is so rarified it goes beyond that of the writer.  David, for example, did not trust from his mother’s breasts.  Here is a faith experience that transcends that of the writer.  It is prophetic.  It is fulfilled in Messiah.  Only he does justice to the poetic vision.  As one writer comments, 

The only adequate and natural interpretation of the psalm is that which sees in it a lyrical prediction of the Sufferings of Messiah and the Glory that was to follow. No Sufferer but One could, without presumption, have expected his griefs to result in the conversion of nations to God.’

The psalm is repeatedly cited in the NT in the narration of the crucifixion (Matt 27:35,37,46).  Jesus cites it (twice) on the cross as do his enemies who surround him though they do so unwittingly.  Both confirm its anticipatory aim.

James H. Brooks wrote, 

‘ the Psalms… describe so largely in prophecy the inner life of the Lord Jesus Christ, who was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin; and unless that fact is kept constantly in view, the Psalms cannot be read intelligently.

For Christ, of course, unlike David, deliverance from death is found beyond death and out of death (Hebs 2:14, 5:7) that he may be not only a model of persistent faith but the source of eternal salvation to all who obey him (Hebs 5:9).  In resurrection he is surrounded no longer by enemies but by his own, those whom he calls ‘his brothers’.  They are his ‘brothers’ not because he became one with them in incarnation (else all men would be his brothers) but because they become one with him through his death and resurrection.  It is in resurrection he acknowledges the believing seed of Abraham as his brothers (Ps 22:22; Hebs 5:9; John 20:17).  

There have been many righteous sufferers throughout history before and since the cross.  Many of God’s sons have their sonship tested through unwarranted inexplicable suffering.  Many have their faith stretched into the jaws of death.  Jesus identifies with them all.  He stands in organic union with all his brothers who suffer for their faith in the God. This psalm and others express not only the response of their authors to undeserved affliction and that of oppressed saints in future generations for whom they provide a resource for prayer but supremely they express the response of the messianic king who becomes in all ways like his brothers, sin apart (Hebs 2).  Messiah became one of us.  He was tested like us.  He was traumatised as we are.  He trusted as we are called to do.  Our cry became his cry.  Our distress his.  And because his faith inevitably outstrips ours so too does the opposition such faith excites and the suffering that follows.  If we want an insight into the physical and mental anguish that Christ experienced then we must reflect on the Psalms.  There we find how he learned what it was to cry to God ‘out of the depths’ (Psalm 130) sometimes day and night without relief (Ps 22).  And when we feel we are just there we are assured he has been there before us and knows how to sustain us in faith (Hebs 4:14-16).

Of course, there is a further dimension to Christ’s sufferings; he  suffered vicariously for sins.  Here too  it seems the Psalms give insight.  Many psalms describe occasions when God judges the writer for personal sin, yet some of these are applied in the NT to Christ.  Clearly they can be so understood only when we realise that unlike the writer he suffered not for his own sin but for that of others.  But here we begin to explore yet another way in which the psalms are prophecy of the Christ.  And this, along with Messiah as both the ideal ‘blessed’ man of Psalm 1 and the favoured ‘son of man’ of Psalm 8 (Hebs 2)  must await another time.  

11
Apr
15

marriage, man and woman, an observation

I listened to a podcast a few moments ago where the speaker made an observation on Genesis One regarding marriage I had not heard before and thought worth sharing.  He pointed out that the creation story concerns a series of binary complements that are integral to how things are intended to be.

We read of God creating the heavens and the earth.  We read too of light and darkness or night and day, moon and sun, sea and dry land.  Finally, and as a climax we read, ‘male and female’ he created them (in the following chapter we discover this is for marriage).   In each case, both are necessary for the whole. The whole requires the complementary parts to be complete, to be ‘good’.

When, thousands of years later, society begins to reconfigure marriage to include same-sex marriage then not only is it tampering with something very ancient and long established, a scary thing in itself, but is tampering with a building block that Christians believe lies at the very foundation of the created order. Every previous tampering with marriage (polygamy, divorce, etc) has threatened the harmony of life.  It seems indisputable that this even more fundamental attack on the nature of things can only lead to greater chaos, societal dysfunction and decay.  When we erode the divinely ordered foundations trouble can only ensue.

01
Dec
14

definite atonement

I know some will disagree with the contention in this post.  That’s fine.  Christians may disagree agreeably over lots of things.  I wish to simply lay out the basics of why I believe the sacrifice of our Lord was not only universal in extent but also specific in intent.  My focus is not on the universal but on the specific.  It is for me a cause for great wonder and gratitude that God not only loved the world of rebellious humanity but in a specific sense the Son of God loved me, and gave himself for me.

In this snapshot of the atonement then the universal aspects of Christ’s sacrifice are assumed.  The Bible is clear that the sacrifice of Christ had a cleansing effect in heaven itself.  I have no doubt that Christ loved the world -the whole world –  and gave himself for it.  My focus is not on these, nor Is it to deny or diminish these, but to demonstrate that there is a specific focus in the atonement that is more than merely a subset of the whole but is tied in some way to purpose and intent.  In a word, there is clearly a sense in which the atonement is because God loves the world but there is just as clearly a sense in which it is because he loves his own.  If we as humans are capable of such different kinds of love it would be strange if God were not.  If we are capable of making sacrifices that have the potential to benefit many while having a definite intention to benefit our own, why not God.  

covenant

So where is specificity taught?  The best place to begin is with the idea of covenant.  In OT  times covenants were made between specific parties.  Major covenants were often ratified by a covenant blood sacrifice and covenant meal.  Both sacrifice and meal were exclusive to those bound in covenant relationship. The specificity of the sacrifice was underlined by its blood being sprinkled on the covenant people.   In the OT these features can be seen in various significant covenants between God and those with whom he chooses to enter into covenant.  When we come to the NT we see the same covenantal features in the New Covenant.  The covenant sacrifice of the NC is the death of Christ.  In the Upper Room as Jesus eats the Passover Meal (associated with an old people and an old redemption and an old covenant) with his disciples, he introduces a new meal commemorating a new redemption associated with a new covenant with a new (or renewed) people.  We read,

Luke 22:20

In the same way, after the supper he took the cup, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood, which is poured out for you.

Specificity is stamped on the sacrifice.  It is for the covenant people guaranteeing the covenant promises to them.  The covenant people are not indeterminate. They are not nebulous and undefined, a mere potentiality.  They are specific and concrete, those who have faith in Christ.   It is specifically for them the sacrifice is made, upon them it’s blood is sprinkled (1 Peter 1:2),  and it is they who participate in the covenant meal.  They are ‘the many’ of Isaiah 52, 53.  Those who shall be astonished and understand.  Those with whom he shall share a portion and divide the spoil; his offspring (53:10).

In Hebrews this specificity is enhanced.

Hebrews 9:15

For this reason Christ is the mediator of a new covenant, that those who are called may receive the promised eternal inheritance—now that he has died as a ransom to set them free from the sins commiintted under the first

Notice the new covenant sacrifice guarantees salvation blessings for the covenant people. Those in covenant relationship will receive the promised eternal inheritance, the mediator will ensure it and the certainty rests on what his sacrifice achieved.   It didn’t merely potentially ransom them, it actually ransomed them; it set them free from sins.  The sacrifice effected the salvation of the covenant people.

While it is true that the new covenant people are those who believe, in Hebrews it is not their belief that is the focus it God’s call.  The NC people are ‘the called’.   This is of course consistent with how the main covenants work.  It is God (the greater covenant partner) who is sovereign.  The covenant and the covenant partner is always his initiative.  He chooses those with whom he will enter covenant and he decides the terms.  In the NC the divine initiative could not be clearer.  The covenant is monergistic; its his will and power that accomplishes it.  It is a covenant of ‘I will’ (Jer 31:33,34; Ezek 36:22-32).  In this covenant faith, as with all else, is itself a covenant gift (Eph 2:8,9; Roms 12:3; 1 Tim 1:14,14; Phil 1:29; 2Thess 1:3; Luke 22:31,32; Mark 9:24; Luke 17:5).  In the NC God meets its obligations.  Thus those ‘called’ will receive the ‘promised inheritance’ – the death of Christ secures it.

flock

This specificity in the death of Christ is seen elsewhere too.  We see it in John 10 where the shepherd’s death is specifically for the sheep.

John 10:11-15

 11 “I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep. 12 The hired hand is not the shepherd and does not own the sheep. So when he sees the wolf coming, he abandons the sheep and runs away. Then the wolf attacks the flock and scatters it. 13 The man runs away because he is a hired hand and cares nothing for the sheep.  14 “I am the good shepherd; I know my sheep and my sheep know me— 15 just as the Father knows me and I know the Father—and I lay down my life for the sheep.”

The death of the shepherd arises from his love for his sheep.  The sheep are a defined flock. They are those known by the Shepherd and who know him.   They are those the Father has given (10:29).  They are his ‘own’ (10:3, 14). It is for these sheep he dies.  He cares about them in a unique way.  They are the focus of his death.

marriage

Special  love also lies at the heart of the next example; Christ’s love for his bride, the church.

Eph 5:25-27

25 Husbands, love your wives, just as Christ loved the church and gave himself up for her 26 to make her holy, cleansing[a] her by the washing with water through the word, 27 and to present her to himself as a radiant church, without stain or wrinkle or any other blemish, but holy and blameless.

It is impossible to view this love is just part of the general love that God has for the world.  The whole image demands a discriminating, choosing, and bestowing love.  It is the wonder of an  inexplicable love for a moral Cinderella; a purposeful love that intends to transform her into something more wonderful than any fairy tale ending. It would be perverse to muddy this image with injecting the bride’s choice of her lover.  The whole focus is the love of the lover.  It is his delight in someone who is now ‘bone of his bone and flesh of his flesh’.  In a patriarchal culture the selecting love is the initiative of the male.  In this unique, undivided, exclusive love the bride is called to luxuriate and delight.  In it she finds security and dignity.   

And this exclusive love is the reason Christ dies.  Christ loved the church and gave himself for her.  Hallelujah.

The high priest, Caiaphas, declared (albeit unwittingly) the targeted nature of the atonement when he said ,

John 11:52

50 Nor do you understand that it is better for you that one man should die for the people, not that the whole nation should perish.” 51 He did not say this of his own accord, but being high priest that year he prophesied that Jesus would die for the nation, 52 and not for the nation only, but also to gather into one the children of God who are scattered abroad.

Likewise the redeemed in heaven understand that the blood ransom of the cross was designed not to ransom every tribe and language and people and nation but to ransom from among every tribe and language and people and nation.

Revelation 5:9

9 And they sang a new song, saying,

“Worthy are you to take the scroll

and to open its seals,

for you were slain, and by your blood you ransomed people for God

from every tribe and language and people and nation.

Thus as one writer well says, ‘though Christ died for all men in some sense, he didn’t die for all men in the same sense’.  While the atonement is designed to be sufficient for all it is intended to be efficient for the many.

In the words of Romans 3,  

22 Even the righteousness of God which is by faith of Jesus Christ unto all (universal) and upon all them that believe (specific).




the cavekeeper

The Cave promotes the Christian Gospel by interacting with Christian faith and practice from a conservative evangelical perspective.

Archives

Site Posts

August 2016
M T W T F S S
« Apr    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  
Follow Cave Adullam on WordPress.com

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 276 other followers